Music Articles

Want our free newsletter? Come and get it!

First Name

Email




Conductors and instrumentalists should click the magic button!

Menu

Back to Home Page



STUDIO 1

GAMES
AND DIFFERENT GENRES OF MUSIC

Piano Music

Chamber Classical Music

Inspirational Orchestral Music

Classical Composers

Name That Music



STUDIO 2

COMPOSITION TUTORING

Free Composition and Piano Lessons

Piano Music Notes

Learn Music Theory

Finale Music Writing Software

Composing Music to Films

Writing Classical Score

List of Instruments



STUDIO 3

THE RECORDING ROOM

Music Sound Recording Studios

Multitrack Recording Process

Music Mixing Advice

 

 

About Me
Terms of Use
Privacy
Contact Us


Hard Drive Requirements
for Home Recording
Studio Software

"Give me really detailed details about what I need in my home sound studio, or things are going to get ugly… and fast!” At some point, I always have that type of feeling when purchasing products from a computer store. Thankfully, the feeling fades fairly quickly, as I trust where I shop.

What you should purchase is usually what a manual tells you that you need. For example, my recording software (Cubase SX3) requires:

• Windows XP and a 800 MHz processor;

• specific graphic and monitor cards;

• DVD ROM and USB capabilities;

• a minimum processor speed of 2.8 GHz;

• a safe minimum of 512 MB of RAM;

• audio hardware capable of supporting a sampling rate of 44.1 kHz.

I could go on and on, but I have a fear of falling asleep while typing about these specifications. We are composers, darn it, not computer programmers. That type of detail is what your vendor should be aware of. Now, having said that, there are still areas where common sense prevails.

As an example, if the minimum amount of RAM is 512 MB (it’s actually slightly less), then I’m going to add memory. This is something that I would do on a personal computer, so why not on my studio computer?

Here’s another tip. If I’m going to be using midi features a lot in order to compose and I am a fairly decent pianist, why not get a full size, weighted keyboard? This type of keyboard is easier to play as the touch is very similar to a real piano, and the full size provides a large, unrestricted playing area. I would think it is common sense to get the better keyboard for a few hundred dollars more.

Common sense should also be used when buying speakers. A composer needs good speakers and headphones in order to edit music properly. However, exercise caution. How expensive do you want to go? Believe me, you could pay a fortune. Buy good, reliable speakers and some extra sound samples. Moderation and diversity are two good words to keep in the back of your mind when purchasing.

Most good vendors will guide you in the common sense route, but ultimately you will have to make a choice between one of two equally good products. If you feel that you are constantly being pressured to buy the store’s most expensive products, then go someplace else… use your inner voice to guide you!

Finally, a home studio requires QUIET! Does this mean that you must hire a contractor to sound proof a room in your house? Yes and no. Midi tracks don’t require a silent environment. You can scream your lungs out while you record a midi track on your keyboard. It will not make a difference, as only the keyboard is linked to the computer, not your screaming.

As for real audio, you may be able to lay down some tracks, provided you live in a quiet neighbourhood and have nobody wrestling and thumping around the house. Also, there are hard drives available that are specifically designed for recording audio. In other words, they are super quiet and can be in the same room as the person with the microphone.

Of course, if you want absolute quiet, you do need sound proofing. Many composers simply take their project on disc and finalize things in a professional recording studio. Ultimately, you have many options available to you on the road to producing a final product.




Cool Products


Click here for Ready, Set, Compose!, the ultimate resource book for keyboard improvisers, composers and pianists.



Play piano? Click here for our exciting new piece of the month!

 

 

 

Piano Music | Chamber Classical Music | Inspirational Orchestral Music | Classical Composers | Name That Music | Free Composition and Piano Lessons | Piano Music Notes | Learn Music Theory | Finale Music Writing Software | Composing Music to Films | Writing Classical Score | List of Instruments | Music Sound Recording Studios | Multitrack Recording Process | Music Mixing Advice