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STUDIO 1

GAMES
AND DIFFERENT GENRES OF MUSIC

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Name That Music



STUDIO 2

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Finale Music Writing Software

Composing Music to Films

Writing Classical Score

List of Instruments



STUDIO 3

THE RECORDING ROOM

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Multitrack Recording Process

Music Mixing Advice

 

 

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Avoid Multi-Headaches
From the Multitrack Recording Process

Here is a multiple choice question: a multi-track recording is:

a) A process of layering and blending different recordings together. This approach is practical and often necessary if you do not have enough space available to have a lot of instruments playing a score all at the same time.

b) A pain in the neck! Actually it’s a pain in the everything!

The answer is, of course, a), unless you’re a real hothead. In that case, both answers are perfectly acceptable. Rest assured, however, that if you keep a cool head, the multi-track recording process is rather simple and kind of fun.

There are advantages and disadvantages to this type of recording technique. Some of the pluses are:

• detailed one on one work with the instrumentalist that is involved in the individual track recording;

• cost savings at not having to hire an outside studio with a larger recording platform;

• easy scheduling of performers for recording sessions.

An instrumentalist will enjoy playing into a microphone while listening to the music that he/she is adding a track to. The performer listens through headphones while playing into a microphone in a soundproof environment. I find this type of atmosphere friendly and enjoyable, as the performer has the added comfort of knowing that they can do a number of takes until all parties are satisfied.

This type of work can easily be done in a home studio format. It requires very little space as only one performer is playing at any given moment. At this stage of the game, the overhead cost is minimal.

In terms of scheduling, it is often difficult to get an ensemble together all at once. Musicians have busy and erratic schedules. Multi-track recordings allow you to call in musicians for recordings one at a time on a need per basis. This makes scheduling a breeze.

Here are some of the disadvantages associated with multi-tracking:

• spontaneity is often lost in this type of recording technique;

• parts don’t often blend together emotionally.

The above two bullet points are important. When recording live, the pressure of a whole ensemble playing together is part of what gives emotional life and vitality to a performance. Professional ensembles will rise to the occasion spiritually if the pressure is there.

This brings us to emotional balance. It is far more likely that you will get an uninspired track in multi-track processing. This is why most studios prefer live bands to play through their compositions as if they were in a live concert.

There is a studio environment that accommodates for both live and multi-track recording simultaneously. Some professional studios have a number of soundproof rooms that performers can be placed in. The ensemble, armed with instruments and headphones, will then play together. In this way, a composer/editor will get that live feeling of the performance combined with complete multi-track editing control.




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Piano Music | Chamber Classical Music | Inspirational Orchestral Music | Classical Composers | Name That Music | Free Composition and Piano Lessons | Piano Music Notes | Learn Music Theory | Finale Music Writing Software | Composing Music to Films | Writing Classical Score | List of Instruments | Music Sound Recording Studios | Multitrack Recording Process | Music Mixing Advice