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STUDIO 1

GAMES
AND DIFFERENT GENRES OF MUSIC

Piano Music

Chamber Classical Music

Inspirational Orchestral Music

Classical Composers

Name That Music



STUDIO 2

COMPOSITION TUTORING

Free Composition and Piano Lessons

Piano Music Notes

Learn Music Theory

Finale Music Writing Software

Composing Music to Films

Writing Classical Score

List of Instruments



STUDIO 3

THE RECORDING ROOM

Music Sound Recording Studios

Multitrack Recording Process

Music Mixing Advice

 

 

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Special Sound Effects
for a Special Composer

Special people like you need special effects. Isn’t that especially true?

Most of my recording experience comes from one family of recording software. My current choice, Cubase SX3, has compatible hard drives, sound samples and sound cards. Most of this article is based on my experience within these parameters. Other software products are configured slightly differently, although there are similarities between most major music recording programs.

Two main effects that are contained within most recording programs include reverb and filters. Reverb gives music a “less dry” feel. Adding reverb is like adding echo to a music track. Filters, on the other hand, act as removers of unwanted frequencies. In the final product, filters help to produce a cleaner sound.

Within both of these effects you’ll usually have a few different options. For example, in a reverb effect an option may include a concert hall reverb sound or a more subtle type of echo effect. Much depends on what mood your music is trying to convey to your target audience.

Effects like reverb are actually created by adding a special effects track in your music project (the same way that you add an audio or midi track). The select effect from this channel is then guided to whichever track you want to be effected by an internal mixer.

EQ or equalization is another powerful tool that studio editors use. Depending on how you control your equalization settings, you can enhance or cut desired, and undesired frequencies from particular sound tracks. Different controls allow you to change low, mid or high frequencies in terms of the following parameters:

• Gain

• Frequency

• Q

Gain controls the amount of frequency to be cut. Frequency controls the middle frequency of the particular range that can either be raised or cut. Q controls the parameters of the width of the frequency.

Confused? I don’t blame you. There are other effects like delay and distortion… I can go on but there’s no point. The bottom line here is that all of these components are explained in accompanying software manuals. Once you’ve read about the effect and played with it in a tutorial, things will click for you. If you run into problems that a manual can’t seem to solve, phone your reliable technical support team at the store where you bought your computer. If they can’t help you, they’ll usually refer you to someone who can.




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Piano Music | Chamber Classical Music | Inspirational Orchestral Music | Classical Composers | Name That Music | Free Composition and Piano Lessons | Piano Music Notes | Learn Music Theory | Finale Music Writing Software | Composing Music to Films | Writing Classical Score | List of Instruments | Music Sound Recording Studios | Multitrack Recording Process | Music Mixing Advice