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The Bagpipes
Have Many Homes

The bagpipes have been around, in one form or another, for about three thousand years. The range of a bagpipe is one octave, although some types allow for an additional octave range. Four British forms of this instrument are Scottish Highland Bagpipes, Scottish Lowland Bagpipes, Northumbrian Bagpipes and Irish Bagpipes.

Other bagpipes from different countries include: musette (French), gaita (Spanish), Dudelsack (German), zampogna (Italian), dudy (Poland) and masak (Indian).

An interesting fact with respect to this instrument is that music only began to be notated for bagpipes in the nineteenth century. From a composing standpoint, bagpipe music is highly interesting, especially when analyzing the various grace note patterns employed by performers.





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Piano Music | Chamber Classical Music | Inspirational Orchestral Music | Classical Composers | Name That Music | Free Composition and Piano Lessons | Piano Music Notes | Learn Music Theory | Finale Music Writing Software | Composing Music to Films | Writing Classical Score | List of Instruments | Music Sound Recording Studios | Multitrack Recording Process | Music Mixing Advice